Boris Mann

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Obsidian

  • Last Edit: October 03, 2020

Desktop Markdown editor for Mac, Windows, and Linux that has built in backlinking, wikilinks, and Zettelkasten support.

License model is free for personal use, they intend to have paid licenses for commercial use, much like the licensing model for IDEs. Personal users pay for early access and other community features.

From the home page:

In our age when cloud services can shut down, get bought, or change privacy policy any day, the last thing you want is proprietary formats and data lock-in.

With Obsidian, your data sits in a local folder. Never leave your life’s work held hostage in the cloud again.

Plain text Markdown also gives you the unparalleled interoperability to use any kind of sync, encryption, or data processing that works with plain text files.

From the about page:

Although we call it a personal knowledge base or your Second BrainSecond Brain
The concept of wikis goes back to an earlier era of the web. With the advent of blogging (and I would say, RSS feeds to subscribe and follow content from all over), wikis went away for a while.
Wikis probably also get a bad rap from their early incarnation inside company intranets. Aside from a bad editing interface, bad search is the big thing that kills company intranets of all kinds. More on the [[Wiki]] page.
Currently, in 2020, personal and company note repositories are experiencing a re...
, we also like to think of it as an IDE for your notes. You can think of an IDE as a powerful frontend that tries to understand your code, such as where are functions and variables stored, what are their types, and by doing so make it super easy to navigate code and get suggestions as you type.

They used to work on Dynalist.